BAR-B -Q

I was born and raised in the Kansas City area. So, to me, Bar-B-Q means slow cooked smoked meat. The most common fire woods are Hickory, Oak and Pecan. Hickory produces the brightest and boldest flavor, pecan is a little milder and oak is the mildest. Hickory and oak dominate and oak is most common because of price. Pecan is more scarce because of the value of its nuts.  I prefer hickory and pecan is second. I prefer a smoking temperature between 180 and 200 F. I keep the meat below the boiling point to preserve the moisture.

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I built this smoker in 1973. It has been modified several times over the years and looks like this today.  It will take 15 14lb turkeys at one time.

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The following are basic instructions. Rubs and sauces can be added to suite your individual tastes. Be careful with pork, pleasant subtle flavors can be lost in bold herbs and spices.

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WALT’S SMOKED PORK RIBS

 One wood fired smoker capable of maintaining 185o to 200o for 4 1/2 hours.

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Dry rub

Spare ribs, St. Louis style or baby back ribs.

Pork Prep

 The first step is to brine the ribs. Use ½ cup salt to one gallon of water in a nonmetallic container or large plastic bag. Brine in refrigerator or cooler for 24 hours. When the brining is complete remove and lightly rinse the ribs and place on a rack to air dry 30 to 40 minutes. The brining is important to the overall texture of the meat. Also when doing multiple slabs it insures consistent cooking times for all the slabs.

Dry Rub (amount per slab)

2 TBS garlic powder

2 TBS fine ground pepper

2 TBS salt

 Mix herbs and rub all over the pork let stand and bond for at least 15 minutes.

The Cooking

The cooking is done in two steps. First is the smoking phase, second is the finishing stage.

For the smoking stage place the pork in the smoker on an open grate or rack. Maintain a temperature 0f 185o to 200o for 2 1/2 hours. Remove the pork, wrap tightly in several layers of foil to insure no juice can leakout. Return to the smoker for 2 hours. After 2 hours of finish cooking at 185oto 200o remove and place on rack to cool for 1 to 2 hours. (one hour for ribs to be eaten right away.) This rest time allows the meat to reabsorb juice and flavor cooked out.

SAVE THE JUICE

After cooling to the point where it does not burn you carefully open the foil and capture all the juice and set it aside. Defat the juice recovered from the foil. This juice is fantastic for cooking baked beans or green beans. It can be frozen and used later. It makes great Navy beans and cornbread.

BE AWARE every smoker and every piece of meat is different. Consistency can only be achieved with practice and learning your own equipment. Watch what you are doing and your results. The brining of the meat is an important step in the consistency factor particularly if you are smoking several pieces of meat at the same time.

They are ready to serve. If you want a crispy rib, grill on gas or charcoal 2 minutes per side and eat. If you like caramelized B-B-Q sauce, smear on sauce before you finish on the grill.

I smoke 4 to 10 slabs at a time. I have one for supper and the rest I vacuum seal for later. I drop the frozen bag of ribs in boiling water. 20 minutes later I have ribs that taste like they just came out of the smoker. NEVER reheat pork in a microwave, it will destroy those subtle pork flavors you have worked so hard to enhance.

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WALT’S BBQ BEANS

These beans are too simple for words and are out of this world. Dump the following ingredients into a big pot simmer for at least 20 minutes after it comes to a boil. If you like them with a good amount juice they are ready to eat after 20 minutes. If you like them thicker simmer until they reach the desired consistency.

1 28 0z can of BUSHES original baked beans. Drained and pick out the bacon fat chunks.

1/2 cup brown sugar.

1 1/2 cups KC MASTERPEICE HICKORY/BROWN SUGAR BAR-B-Q SAUCE.

1 cup water.

1 1/2 cups finely chopped smoked beef or pork. I use beef burnt ends or the meat from the small end of pork spare rib slab.

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WALT’S SMOKED PORK BUTT

One wood fired smoker capable of maintaining 185o to 200o for 12 hours.

Dry rub

5 to 10 lb. Boston butt (or fresh uncured ham)

salt

Pork Prep (Boston butt, picnic shoulder or fresh ham)

The first step is to brine the pork. If the pork butt or fresh ham has skin and fat score the skin and fat in 1 inch squares. Cut through the skin and into the fat but not deeply into the lean. Use ½ cup salt to one gallon of water in a nonmetallic container or large plastic bag. Brine at room temp for 24 hours. If you are concerned about room temp brining then brine in refrigerator for 48 hours. If your pork wants to float turn it skin side up in the brine and place two layers of paper towels on the skin. When the brining is complete remove and lightly rinse the pork and place on a rack to air dry 30 to 40 minutes.

Dry Rub

2 TBS garlic powder

2 TBS fine ground pepper

2 TBS salt

4 TBS Emeril’s Essence Southwest

Mix herbs and rub all over the pork let stand and bond for at least 15 minutes.

The Cooking

The cooking is done in two steps. First is the smoking phase second is the finishing stage.

For the smoking stage place the pork in the smoker on an open rack or grill at 185o to 200o for 5 hours. Remove the pork, wrap tightly in several layers of foil to insure no juice can leakout. Return to the smoker for 7 hours. After 7 hours of finish cooking remove and place on rack to cool for 1 to 2 hours.

Alternate Cooking Method

Use double amount of rub, wrap tightly in 3 layers of foil. Bake in 190o oven for 12 hrs. catch and reserve all juices.

The Pulling

After cooling to the point where it does not burn you carefully open the foil and capture all the juice and set it aside. The pulling is basically removing fat and bones and shredding all the lean meat. Defat the juice recovered from the foil and add it back to the shredded meat.

Sliced Pork Shoulder

While the pork shoulder is still hot you can grasp the shoulder blade bone with a pair of pliers and pull it out. Then rewrap it tightly and place in the refrigerator. The next day you can slice for sandwiches or have with potatoes and eggs. We slice some of it up in 1/2 inch thick stakes, vacuum seal it and freeze it. Later, drop the bags in boiling water for 15 minutes and you have the main course for a meal. Soooo tender you can eat it with a spoon.

BE AWARE every smoker and every piece of meat is different. Consistency can only be achieved with practice and learning your own equipment.Watch what you are doing and your results. The brining of the meat is an important step in the consistency factor particularly if you are smoking several pieces of meat at the same time.

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     WALT’S SMOKED BRISKET

 One wood fired smoker capable of maintaining 185o to 200o for 14 hours.

Dry rub

1 whole brisket.

NOTE: fat trimming of the whole brisket is up to the individual. Search you-tube and the internet. There are as many perfect ways to trim a brisket as there are briskets to be trimmed.

salt

Brisket prep

The first step is to brine the brisket. Use ½ cup of salt to one gallon of water in a nonmetallic container or large plastic bag. Brine in refrigerator for 24 hours. When the brining is complete remove and lightly rinse, pat dry and place on a rack to air dry 30 to 40 minutes.

Dry Rub

3 TBS garlic powder

3 TBS fine ground pepper

2 TBS salt

4 TBS Emeril’s EssenceSouthwest

Mix herbs and rub all over the brisket and let stand and bond for at least 15 minutes.

The Cooking

The cooking is done in two steps. First is the smoking phase second is the finishing stage.

 For the smoking stage place the meat in the smoker 185o  to 200o for 6 hours. Remove the meat, wrap tightly in several layers of foil to insure no juice leaks out. Return to the smoker for 10 hours. (The finish cooking can be done in an electric or gas oven set to 195 degrees.)After 8 hours of finish cooking remove and place on rack to cool for 1 to 2hours. Do not open foil.

Alternate Cooking method

Double the amount of rub. wrap tightly in three layers of foil. Place in standard oven and bake at 190 degrees for 14hrs.

The Slicing

After cooling to the pointwhere it does not burn you carefully open the foil and capture all the juiceand set it aside. Trim the edges of the flat for burnt ends. The meat will fall apart. If you are going to slice and serve right away you will need a verysharp knife. The use of a steel every 7 or 8 slices may help. If you are going to use later on sandwiches chill in refrigerator before trimming burnt ends. Itwill slice easier when chilled. Whether serving warm or chilled defat the juice recovered from the foil and add it back to the sliced meat.

BE AWARE every smoker and every piece of meat is different. Consistency can only be achievedwith practice and learning your own equipment. Watch what you are doing and your results. The brining of the meat is an important step in the consistencyfactor particularly if you are smoking several pieces of meat at the same time.

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SMOKED BEEF SUMMER SAUSAGE

The following recipe makes a snack meat that is very firm and is similar to beef sticks.  It slices thin for meat and cheese trays.  Be sure to buy the cheapest hamburger you can find because you need a lot of fat in it. The fat cooks away but it is necessary for the texture of the finished product.  Note the salt is not regular salt, however most stores carry it.  It can be baked in the oven or smoked.  

5  pounds very cheap hamburger

3  teaspoons tender quick salt (I use Morton’s)

1 1/2  teaspoons garlic salt

2  teaspoons mustard seed

2  teaspoons cracked black pepper

2  teaspoons hickory smoke salt

NOTE: Add what ever herbs and spices that suits your palate. I also use red-pepper flakes.

Mix and knead ingredients together. Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours. Mix and knead again and cover and refrigerate for another 24 hours. Knead for at least 2 minutes each time. The more you knead it the firmer and easier to slice it will be. After 48 hours knead it again and divide mixture into fourths.  Make 4 rolls. Lay rolls in a broiler pan so that the fat will drain away from the roll. Smoke in smoker 180 to 200 degrees for 4 hours. OR, bake in a 180‑200 degree oven for 4 hours uncovered.

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